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Field Museum Collection
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conorp
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ankhesenamun wrote:
Negative confession as I understand it is when the deceased, on their journey to the afterlife, has to state that he did NOT do a number of sinful things such as "I did not steal my neighbour's property" etc. There are 42 of them in total and 42 gods to whom you have to state these confessions.


Thankyou for this
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmt_sesh wrote:
I am fining you 10,000 and confiscating your tickets to the Tut exhibit (for myself, of course; and naturally the 10,000 is to pay for a luxury trip for myself to London).

Hey, you can't take my Tutankhamun tickets off me! It's only over a month away now, so I'm really starting to look forward to it now! Dancing Good luck with getting the 10,000 off me, too; I don't think I've ever even seen that much money before! Crying or Very sad

kmt_sesh wrote:
I doubt this one was on that disk of photos I sent you. I took it expressly for these installments of pictures I'm posting and don't know if I've ever photographed it before.

I didn't think I'd seen that picture before, but I just assumed that I was probably just being incredibly forgetful, as per usual. I didn't know you were specifically taking photos for this thread, but next time you're snapping away with your little camera, you know what everyone would love to see photos of, right? The market scene from the tomb of Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep! (What?! I resent that remark. This is in no way a benefit to me! Laughing )

kmt_sesh wrote:
There's another one behind it and to the right, but there's no way I can photograph that one with any clarity. Both are in excellent states of preservation.

Are either of the other two in the hotep shape? There was a hotep shaped offering table discovered in KV5, but it was really badly damaged, and is only a fragment. Sad
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

conorp wrote:
Quote:
Negative Confession:

Could you please explain what this means?


Ankhesenamun did a nice job of answering that. I can add that this list of confessions varied from text to text and reflected the situation of the person for whom a particular Book of the Dead was prepared. For example, as a temple chantress, Isty announces in her Negative Confession that she did not commit any shameful acts with a priest. That's specific to someone in her line of work.

The most famous Negative Confession probably comes from the text of Ani, from Dynasty 18. Here's a web page that shows it in translation. Note that the ba-soul of Ani first cries out the name of the Assessor and then explicitly states the sin he did not commit. It's the same concept as seen in the text for Isty.

Further, it was believed crying out the name of the god would gain control of that deity, and thereby help the ba-soul lie through his teeth even if he had committed a particular sin 4,856,374 times in his life. Razz One often sees the deceased clearly announcing the names of gods and demons in the journey undertaken by the ba-soul, and that's the reason behind it.
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 11:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daughter_Of_SETI wrote:
Quote:
Hey, you can't take my Tutankhamun tickets off me! It's only over a month away now, so I'm really starting to look forward to it now!


Well, all right, you can keep the tickets. But I must insist on the 10,000 or something of equivalent value. If necessary ship your nephew to me. My apartment is a mess and needs a thorough cleaning. He's good at that sort of stuff, right?

Quote:
...but next time you're snapping away with your little camera, you know what everyone would love to see photos of, right? The market scene from the tomb of Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep!


LOL You know what I thought you were going to say? I thought you were going to request photos of that creepy "Michael Jackson" bust we have. I'm glad you didn't ask for that. But fear not, sooner or later in one of my installments I shall post photos of the wall scene. I have quite a few photos of it.

Quote:
Are either of the other two in the hotep shape? There was a hotep shaped offering table discovered in KV5, but it was really badly damaged, and is only a fragment.


No, they're not. I haven't seen ones quite like that in our collection. However, the offering table in Unis-Ankh's mastaba has the hotep-glyph carved into it, but the table is not a real antiquity. It was made for us by Mark Lehner.
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmt_sesh wrote:
But I must insist on the 10,000 or something of equivalent value. If necessary ship your nephew to me. My apartment is a mess and needs a thorough cleaning. He's good at that sort of stuff, right?

I'm sure if you wanted your apartment to be more messy, my nephew would do an excellent job for you, but if you want it to look more organised, then a five year old kid is probably not the way to go. Whenever he's been here for a few days it always looks like a tornado has passed through, but if you want to take the chance I can send him off to you. Wink Hey, it would give all us a break, though you might have his Mummy coming to Chicago to come and demand her kiddy back. Laughing

kmt_sesh wrote:
I'm glad you didn't ask for that. But fear not, sooner or later in one of my installments I shall post photos of the wall scene. I have quite a few photos of it.

Seriously, I thought that you'd never taken any pictures of the scene before. I would be you slave for ever and ever if you show us those photos! Applause Don't worry, I don't think I'd ever want to see any more of that wacko Jacko bust. puke_r
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2008 12:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
...but if you want it to look more organised, then a five year old kid is probably not the way to go. Whenever he's been here for a few days it always looks like a tornado has passed through, but if you want to take the chance I can send him off to you.


What? I thought you had the kid trained by now. Isn't that why you like to have him over? Well, no, the last thing I need is a tornado going through an apartment that already looks like it's been hit by a hurricane. Best keep him there with you.

Quote:
Hey, it would give all us a break, though you might have his Mummy coming to Chicago to come and demand her kiddy back. Laughing


LOL I had to read that twice before I figured out what you meant by "Mummy." I couldn't understand why a crusty old Egyptian body would come demanding his return. Or why the kid would have a mummy in the first place.

Quote:
I would be you slave for ever and ever if you show us those photos! Applause


Oh, so you could clean my apartment for me? And all I have to do is post some photos? Well, here you go! Ha, gotcha! I'll bet you weren't expecting that. Razz Don't worry, that wall scene will be included in one of my upcoming installments of photos.
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conorp
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 4:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
upcoming installments of photos.


When and what?
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 4:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I haven't decided yet. I got caught up in regular posting tonight and didn't even have time to prepare more photos. But fear not! The next batch will be coming soon.
Wink
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 4:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, I changed my mind and am working on the next batch now. Should be coming up pretty quick...
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 6:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

EVERY-DAY LIFE

As befitting any decent collection the Field has quite a large assortment of antiquities pertaining to the every-day life of ancient Egypt. There are far too many items in this part of the exhibit to share here so I've selected what I hope to be an adequate sampling. These items are divided into several subcategories for inclusion here. They cover the entire length of ancient Egyptian history.

Domestic Items

Adult bed. Early Dynastic Period. Wood with probably leather strapping (now gone) for the support. Crafted for an upper-class person, probably a woman. Note decorated feet in animal-form, and wood headrest. This bed is at least 4,700 years old.

Child's bed. Early Dynastic Period. It's unclear if this was found in the same tomb as the adult bed, above, but it's very possible; the craftsmanship is very similar between the two. Absence of headrest. As above, this bed is at least 4,700 years old.

Stool and vessels. In the back-left corner is a wood-framed stool with ornamented animal feet; the seat was probably cane or rushes originally. Vessels of stone and ceramic accompany the stool; note the beautifully decorated ceramic vessel at center. To the side is the left end of the Early Dynastic child's bed, seen above.

Storage casket. Made of limestone, with a sliding lid on which is a recumbent canid, likely a dog or jackal. Probably used for storing jewelry or other valuables. To the right is a tiny casket also for storing valuables, and made of calcite. Note the oil lamp partially visible behind the larger casket.

Sandals. Plaited rushes or papyrus. Note the unusual style. The Field has numerous sandals on display but these are unique in the collection--may be of foreign design or influence. Note the sandal bottoms on the floor of the display case, in the background; these are of a more traditional Egyptian design.

Tools. Visible are small bronze chisels, a diorite pounder, wooden mallet, and, to the right, a flint drill-bit with wooden shaft (the latter a modern replacement) demonstrating usage in a sample of limestone. The mallet is much the same as those used in the quarry work for the pyramids but the tools in general could be used for a wide variety of construction. The small size of the chisels indicates their use for fine detail work in carving or inscriptions.

Scribal equipment. On the base of the display case and propped up to the right are wooden scribal palettes, the latter of which contains a sampling of reed styli. More styli rest, bundled, on the base. The wells in the propped-up palette still contain ample residues of red and black pigments. The blue-glazed palette at left is inscribed with the name of Sety II, from Dynasty 19; it is ritualistic and was probably never used by the king, and likely originates from his tomb (KV15).

Amulets. Examples worn by the living, mostly of blue-glazed composition. In foreground is an amulet of the god Bes, next to which are two styles of molds used to produce other Bes amulets; this style of amulet was often worn as a necklace by children, to protect them from malevolent forces. A wide assortment of amulets was worn by the living for the purposes of protection, fertility, and the like.

Beautification: hair removal. At top is a pair of bronze razors, and at front-center a pair of tweezers for the removal of finer hairs on the body. The small jars would've held ointments, creams, and perfumes.

Beautification: mascara application. An assortment of kohl tubes and spoons, the former of calcite and the latter primarily of bronze. To the left are samples of malachite, galena, ochre, and other minerals used for mascara. The calcite and other stonewear vessels would've held oils, perfumes, and liniments. At right can be seen a couple of bronze mirrors decorated with the images of the goddess Hathor.

Jewelry

Necklaces. Primarily of blue-glazed composition, a cheaper alternative to turquoise or lapis lazuli that could be produced in many shades of blue and green. Also present are necklaces of carnelian, the one at right containing calcite plugs and beads. Note at far right the counterpoise, for offsetting the weight of a heavy necklace like a broadcollar.

Necklaces. Further examples, also primarily of blue-glazed composition. This is often called faience in museums but technically that is not correct. Note the necklace second from left with the highly colorful pendants meant to resemble seashells.

Rings. Primarily of blue-glazed composition; at far right, however, is one of solid gold. Note the highly ornamented filagree designs of the three blue-glazed rings at center. Below the rings are examples of bronze bracelets.

Assortment of jewelry. Numerous examples of hammered or solid gold rings, earrings, and clothing ornaments in the form of scarabs. Note the details in this archival photograph, with scarabs below and the face of Hathor above (these were probably stitched to shawls or gowns of linen). Many of the rings in this case are inscribed. Note the three rings on the bottom-most shelf, at far left. The center ring has a gold band and a jade bezel which is inscribed on the visible faces: "Menkheperre, lord of the two lands, king of foreign kings" (this was a seal-ring belonging to an official in the court of Tuthmosis III).

Vessels

The following are a few examples of other vessels in the collection.

Amarna blue-ware. Pigments are faded but the background is primarily blue; together with the geometric designs, this style is unique to the Amarna Period. Also distinctively Amarna in design is this red-ware pot, at the center of which is a lotus design. Both pots are ceramic.

Amphorae. Cermaic, New Kingdom. Probably for holding wine or beer. Utilitarian in design.

Early Dynastic vessels. All of various types of stone and each between 4,700 and 5,000 years old. Note the elaborate mottled limestone vessel third from left, with the separately fitted collar.

Predynastic vessels. Beautifully crafted of different types of stone. Note the lugs on the two pots at right, through which a cord could be passed for transport. These vessels date to the Naqada II and Naqada III periods.

Predynastic vessels and materials. A wide variety of artifacts from all stages of Predynastic Egypt. Note the slate cosmetic palettes at center, which have been found in many shapes and styles. In front of the palettes is an assortment of flint arrowheads, axes, hammers, and similar tools. The red-ware, black-topped ceramic vessels at top are from the Naqada I and Naqada II periods. At bottom, next to the green bowl, are two pieces of a small, broken stone mace. Note the high quality in the manufacture of many of the vessels, particularly at bottom. Even in prehistory the Egyptians were expert with ceramics and stonewear.
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Daniella
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 19, 2008 1:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really enjoyed this latest installment of yours John, I especially loved the jewelry! (you know me...lol).

Thank you for sharing your museum with us! Very Happy
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 19, 2008 2:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're most welcome, Daniella, and I'm glad you enjoyed the jewelry. I only wish my photographs were better.

So the next time I'm at the Field and notice that some of our jewelry is missing, I'll know where to send the authorities. Laughing
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Daniella
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 1:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
So the next time I'm at the Field and notice that some of our jewelry is missing, I'll know where to send the authorities.

Laughing Well, better with me than wasting away behind some glass. Wink

Seriously though, they must be really fragile. Or maybe just the string is fragile, I'm sure you could take the beads and restring it.

I think that's one thing I would give my right arm for, a piece of ancient Egyptian jewelry like a necklace or a bracelet (although I'd have to wear it on my left wrist...lol). But I'd love to wear a piece like that, knowing that the last person to wear it was an Egyptian who lived over 3000 years ago. love4
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 4:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The necklaces you see in my photos are almost certainly restrung. They probably would've been found in little chests, boxes, or caskets with the threads near-rotted or long-rotted and the beads rattling around loose.

Many women comment on how beautiful the jewelry is. I think many women (not just you) enjoy wearing similar styles to what women wore in Egypt thousands of years ago. Of course, most of these women don't have plans to swipe our jewelry.

I'm keeping my eyes on you, young lady! Twisted Evil

And with that, I'm ready for my next installment of photographs. It should be ready very soon now. Smile
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conorp
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 4:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

sorry sesh'y, i thought i had commented on these latest photos.

I just wanted to comment how beautiful this is

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a98/kmt_sesh/FIELD%20MUSEUM/AmarnaVase_Blue.jpg
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