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Field Museum Collection
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 23, 2008 9:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay, I was at the Field today and did a little more digging. There does not appear to be anything more about Apunefer's coffin. I came across three entries in the database I hadn't seen before but there was no information, and the archival photos I wanted to see of the coffin have not yet been scanned and digitized. Lord only knows when that will happen. Sad
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conorp
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2008 5:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmt_sesh wrote:
Okay, I was at the Field today and did a little more digging. There does not appear to be anything more about Apunefer's coffin. I came across three entries in the database I hadn't seen before but there was no information, and the archival photos I wanted to see of the coffin have not yet been scanned and digitized. Lord only knows when that will happen. Sad


Well thankyou anyway Smile
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conorp
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2008 9:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



Again is this common. Razz

Burial is not the "Best" side of me :LOL:
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2008 4:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Again is this common. Razz

Burial is not the "Best" side of me :LOL:


Death and burial is my favorite topic for study. Very Happy

I'm funny that way. Or morbid. Perhaps a bit of both. Funnily morbid? Morbidly funny?

Anyway, there is plenty of precedent for this style of canopic equipment, but of course it's not nearly as common as the jars. I'm not certain in which period it's most commonly seen but it harkens to the burials of some royals, such as the immediately recognizable golden coffinetes of Tutankhamun. It would seem high-ranking private persons started to carry on this practice in Dynasty 19, such as with the painted limestone coffinettes of Sennedjem (an official under Seti I and Ramesses II, buried in TT1). It all boils down to regarding the canopic package as an important part of the individual, and therefore making that package resemble a miniature version of the mummy. I don't know whether this tall canopic package on view at the Field was ever placed inside some sort of coffinette, but even if it wasn't the concept is the same.

How about some papyri for my next installment of photographs? The Field has several Books of the Dead and I have their photos ready for posting.
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conorp
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2008 5:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry i have been away and didnt get a chance to see your post. Smile

Thanks for the info

Quote:
How about some papyri for my next installment of photographs? The Field has several Books of the Dead and I have their photos ready for posting.


YES PLEASE lol
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2008 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry for the delay. I had meant to post a new installment over the weekend but got caught up in other activities. I haven't forgotten, though! Smile
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conorp
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2008 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmt_sesh wrote:
Sorry for the delay. I had meant to post a new installment over the weekend but got caught up in other activities. I haven't forgotten, though! Smile


Yes i had a busy weekend also, so i understand what your going through.
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 3:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Would you mind if i made a .pdf on my website about Apunefer.

Do you mind if i use your photos and the translation. I would give you credit for that in the .pdf. I will also add some infomation about rushed sarcophagi.???????????????????????????????


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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 3:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Feel free to do so, conorp. Wink

Again, you may use my own photos as long as you give credit to the Field Museum of Natural History. All I did was take the pictures; the artifacts belong to the Field.

However, I would prefer you not use the archival photographs I have been sharing. Those are property of the museum. Every time I use such a photo I clearly mark it as archival, so if you don't see that word with one of the photos, you're safe in using it.

You needn't give me, personally, any credit, unless you feel it necessary. LOL Besides, people will wonder who in the hell "kmt_sesh" is.
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 3:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I would prefer you not use the archival photographs
I wasnt going to use these anyway

Thanks for permision
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 6:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PAPYRI

The Field Museum has several Books of the Dead in its collection, most of which are on display in the galleries. These texts range in date from the New Kingdom to the Ptolemaic Period, and I will identify them below by either their owners or time period, or both.

Further, I am familiar with the Book of the Dead and its development, place, and purpose in ancient Egyptian afterlife concepts. However, I am not so adept that I can look at a particular spell and automatically know which one it is according to the system of numbering devised by modern scholarship. Therefore, if I do not identify a spell by number or name and anyone looking at these photos does so recognize it, please feel free to let me know. I'd appreciate it.

Finally, please excuse the particularly poor quality of many of my photos in this installment. All of the Books of the Deads on public display are quite difficult to photograph, due to lighting, positioning, and conservation techniques.

Khonsurenpe, New Kingdom

Khonsurenpe was a priest and scribe in the temple of Amun at Thebes, in Dynasty 19 or Dynasty 20. According to records his Book of the Dead was found in his tomb in the Theban necropolis, although today the location of this tomb is no longer known.

Start of text. Contains probably a simplified version of Spell 186, honoring Hathor, as seen by the cow with the sun disk. The inscription accompanying her says: "Hathor, lady of the west; that she may provide everything good and pure." Note the abstract depiction of Khonsurenpe's tomb at bottom-left, out front of which is a reclined Anubis with the inscription: "Anubis, lord of the sacred land, the great god; that he may provide everything good and pure."

Tree of life. The goddess Nut is shown with an offering tray in one hand and a libation vessel in the other, from which she pours water for the refreshment of Khonsurenpe, who is shown kneeling at her feet.

At the offering table. Khonsurenpe provisioned at an overflowing offering table, before which stands a funerary priest in his leopard robes. The texts above the men provide Khonsurenpe's name and titles and list many of the provisions and offerings he will have through eternity (the customary phrase xA-m, "a thousand of," is repeatedly represented with particular offerings).

Khonsurenpe below an altar. Flames issue from the altar, on which four baboons perch. Next to this scene is a pair of netherworld barques, and in the lower of the two Khonsurenpe is shown with (from the front) Isis, Horus, and Anubis. In the upper barque is Horus as king at the bow; within the shrine Nephthys (right) and Isis venerate an icon.

Mourning scene. Khonsurenpe as a mummy occupies the center, on his funeral bier; at his head is probably Nephthys and at his feet Isis, who kneel in mourning and hold what look to be small ointment jars for anointing. Along the top register (from right) are the gods Thoth, Horus, Anubis, Imset, and Hapi; along the bottom (from right) are Hu, Sia, Heka, Duamutef, and Qebehsenuef. The whole scene is depicted within a shrine.

Spell 125, Negative Confession. An abbreviated form shown in the vignettes along the top, at the beginning of which Khonsurenpe in ba-form venerates the Benu bird. To the left some of the Assessors are shown squatting and holding Feathers of Truth.

Spell 125, Weighing of the Heart. Standard scene showing Anubis officiating the test, with Thoth recording the results at left. In the left pan is a miniature version of the goddess Maat; in the right pan, Khonsurenpe's heart. The monster Ammut reclines below the scales and gazes hungrily at the heart. The inscription next to Thoth begins: "That he [Khonsurenpe] give the truth in the necropolis..." Of course the scales prove that Khonsurenpe is vindicated. Here is an archival photo of the same portion of the papyrus; to the right is Osiris, overseeing the judgement scene.

Hymn to Re. A beautifully rendered depiction of Re-Horakhty in his solar barque, which is held aloft by a personified djed pillar. Maat squats at the bow of the barque. In the top register are four baboons venerating Re; in the bottom two registers four deities do the same, along with four depictions of Khonsurenpe as a ba-soul.

Khonsurenpe arrives. Vertical columns listing the titles and manifestations of Osiris and at the same time announcing the arrival of Khonsurenpe as the Osiris into the afterlife. Khonsurenpe is shown at center beside an offering table. The vertical registers as seen on the right side of Khonsurenpe.

Welcomed into the afterlife. Khonsurenpe is welcomed by Osiris and Isis and stands before them in the posture of adoration.

Isty, Third Intermediate Period

Isty was a chantress of Amun-Re in the same temple where Khonsurenpe worked, in Thebes. Her Book of the Dead probably dates to Dynasty 21 or Dynasty 22. It is richly pigmented but contains only a couple of spells. This text was found in the late nineteenth century in an abandoned tomb filled with other people's Books of the Dead. Isty was probably buried in a family crypt in the Theban necropolis, although its location in that necropolis is not known.

Offering processions. Workers harvest wheat in the top register, in front of which is a Benu bird and the goddess Hathor seated on a throne; the chantress Isty stands before her in veneration. In the bottom register is a procession of offering bearers carrying ritual jars; Isty appears twice at the front of the line, first holding a wig on a tray and then pouring a ritual blessing onto the god Osiris, who is on his throne.

Funerary scenes. In the top register Isty stands before an enthroned Osiris again; beyond, she is shown presenting an offering with a flame to three squatting gods. In the bottom register Anubis (or a priest wearing the god's mask) attends to Isty's mummification. At her feet is Nephthys, unpainted; at her head, a goddess with a crocodile head. An archival photo showing a wider view of the depictions in the preceding photographs.

Spell 125, Negative Confession. The text does not have a vignette of the weighing of the heart but shows all forty-two lines of the Negative Confession, which many fuller texts do not. The spell starts on the right: at top in each column is the name of the Assessor-deity, at center is a drawing of that god, and at bottom is the sin Isty confirms she did not commit in life.

Anointing Isty. The gods Anubis and Thoth anoint and bless Isty. On the plinth where she stands is her name and title: "The Osiris, lady of the house, chantress of Amun, Isty."

Isty's name. Evidence that the text was not originally made for Isty, but was purchased and her name later written in. See the outlined (red) portions: at right Isty's name fits clumsily and spills down the side; at left the heavy and blotchy ink in her name stands out from the crisper and more carefully rendered glyphs surrounding it.

[url]Welcomed into the afterlife[/url] (archival photo). Isty stands before Osiris and Isis and presents offerings to them as they welcome her. Behind Isty is a huge mound of offerings, on top of which Re as the scarab-form Khepri is reborn at dawn. As Re is reborn into the new day, Isty is reborn into the afterlife.

Other Books of the Dead

Two other Books of the Dead are on public display and may be shown here. They are generally not as well executed as Khonsurenpe's and Isty's texts, nor are they as well preserved; however, they are both good examples of more economically prepared funerary texts.

Padihorpakhared, Late Period. A monochromatic text that sustained heavy water damage. The script is very nicely rendered and neatly drawn, as are the vignettes. At top you can make out Padihorpakhared as a mummy on his bier with his ba-soul hovering above him; in front of the mummy stands a Benu bird. Off to the left Padihorpakhared's ba is shown inside a shrine. [url]Archival photo[/url] of the same text. At left you can make out the two rows of Assessors in Spell 125; the weighing of the heart is at bottom, although damaged.

Ptolemaic Period text. Written in demotic script. The figures of the deities are clumsily drawn. At center is Spell 125, showing the weighing of the deceased's heart.

[url]Text not on display[/url] (archival photo). I am not certain of the period from which this Book of the Dead comes, although the spells look to be drawn in hieratic script. At top-center is a vignette of crudely drawn figures showing Osiris and Isis at right and the Four Sons of Horus on the lotus before them. At left is Thoth with his scribal palette, and in front of Thoth looks to be Ammut seated on a shrine.
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 9:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, going back to your earlier post, Kmt_sesh. I just wanted to comment on how beautiful this artefact is. I don't think I've seen that one before, have I? In fact, I'm not sure I've ever seen any intact offering table before. Surprised Have you ever done a translation of the piece before?
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 10:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Sorry, going back to your earlier post, Kmt_sesh. I just wanted to comment on how beautiful this artefact is. I don't think I've seen that one before, have I? In fact, I'm not sure I've ever seen any intact offering table before. Surprised Have you ever done a translation of the piece before?


Sorry, no questions pertaining to older installments. I am fining you 10,000 and confiscating your tickets to the Tut exhibit (for myself, of course; and naturally the 10,000 is to pay for a luxury trip for myself to London).

Or maybe not. Razz I certainly don't mind questions about any of the photos I have already posted or will post.

I doubt this one was on that disk of photos I sent you. I took it expressly for these installments of pictures I'm posting and don't know if I've ever photographed it before. It turned out rather well, I should say, considering it's in a somewhat tricky spot. There's another one behind it and to the right, but there's no way I can photograph that one with any clarity. Both are in excellent states of preservation.

I've never done a translation of it but it's a standard offering slab. It dates to the Late Period but you'll find them from many periods of Egypt. From other samples I've seen in photographs the texts are basic to offerings and provisions, as would befit its purpose.
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Spell 125, Negative Confession. The text does not have a vignette of the weighing of the heart but shows all forty-two lines of the Negative Confession, which many fuller texts do not. The spell starts on the right: at top in each column is the name of the Assessor-deity, at center is a drawing of that god, and at bottom is the sin Isty confirms she did not commit in life.


Negative Confession:

Could you please explain what this means?
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Negative confession as I understand it is when the deceased, on their journey to the afterlife, has to state that he did NOT do a number of sinful things such as "I did not steal my neighbour's property" etc. There are 42 of them in total and 42 gods to whom you have to state these confessions.
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