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Field Museum Collection
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conorp
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 4:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks you for that information and the picture of the coffin..

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a98/kmt_sesh/FIELD%20MUSEUM/ApuneferCase.jpg
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a98/kmt_sesh/FIELD%20MUSEUM/IMG_0068.jpg

Just another question about these, are the inscriptions correct? I mean are they spelt right and everything or were some glyths skipped to save time?
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 6:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

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I think for my next installment I'll post photos of burial equipment and other funerary goods with which tombs were stocked.


When will be expect to see this?
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Just another question about these, are the inscriptions correct? I mean are they spelt right and everything or were some glyths skipped to save time?


The inscriptions are mostly legible and can be translated rather easily, but it's obvious that whoever wrote them did not have an expert command of hieroglyphs. That's not so unusual--many artifacts and monuments bear mistakes in their inscriptions, just as we make mistakes when we write.

The transverse registers running from the center and wrapping around the sides simply mention Apunefer's name and refer to him as the "revered one." All of these show some degree of abbreviation, including with the name in one or two spots.

The main inscription running down the center is a standard offering formula, and it contains the most mistakes. Some of the glyphs are painted backwards, such as the R8 banner-glyph in nTr-aA ("the great god") and the pair of H1 bird-head glyphs in the word Apd(w) ("fowl"). In the kA ("cattle") portion along with the bird heads you usually just see the F1 cow-head glyph, but here an entire cow has been clumsily painted. The town name AbDw ("Abydos") is pretty badly garbled but a couple of the glyphs correctly rendered make it clear what is meant. Some of the glyphs aren't much more than blobs and don't seem to say anything clearly. All in all, however, the inscriptions are legible.

Quote:
When will be expect to see this?


I'll be posting the photos of the burial goods and equipment probably within the next couple of days, depending on available time. Wink
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conorp
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 5:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

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The inscriptions are mostly legible and can be translated rather easily


Do you have this translation?

Quote:
I'll be posting the photos of the burial goods and equipment probably within the next couple of days


Yay
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 4:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My apologies for taking so long to return to this discussion. I appreciate your patience. I've been otherwise engaged most of this week, but again the weekend has arrived to save my sanity. Er, what's left of it to save, at least. Anxious

Quote:
Do you have this translation?


Apunefer's offering formula says: "An offering which the king gives to Osiris, the great god, lord of Abydos; that he provide offerings, an invocation of fowl and cattle and alabaster [...] for the soul of the deceased [...] the West(?) [...]"

The glyphs on the ankle-portion of the coffin and down on the feet are very worn and not well rendered, and so are difficult to confirm. Nonetheless it's a standard offering formula.

And with that, I can move on to the next installment of photographs. Smile
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 6:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BURIAL EQUIPMENT & FUNERARY GOODS

In order to control post length I'm including this classification of artifacts separately from the post on mummies, coffins, and sarcophagi. This post covers other artifacts commonly found in Egyptian tombs.

Canopic Equipment

Canopic jars assortment. All dating to Late Period and made of calcite. None of these are inscribed. In the front row, from left, is Duamutef (stomach), Hapi (lungs), Imseti (liver), and Qebehsenuef (intestines).

Canopic jars, matched set. Late Period, for the burial of Hapitnetjer. Limestone and black paint. All four bear the same inscription, an offering formula: "The Osiris, Hapitnetjer, the justified; that he be provided offerings and clothing." All four are solid stone and do not open, meaning they are model canopics (Hapitnetjer's organs were probably wrapped and placed between his legs).

Canopic chest, Middle Kingdom. Dynasty 11 or 12, for the burial of Hemenhotep (see the "Middle Kingdom and New Kingdom" section of my original post for a photo of the matching coffin). Painted inscriptions are badly worn.

Canopic chest, Third Intermediate Period. Brightly painted and richly inscribed. At center is Osiris shown as a djed pillar holding crook and flail, above which the inscription says: "Lord of Abydos, foremost of the Westerners, lord of Djedu [...]."

Canopic box, Ptolemaic Period. Painted wood, showing later practice of one box representing all four Sons of Horus (Duamutef is depicted on the visible side); it's possible there was no other canopic equipment with this particular burial.

Canopic package. Dates to Late Period, with the mask of Duamutef (the intricate linen wrappings contain a mummified stomach). Alternative to the jars; each organ, as part of the body, is wrapped as a miniature mummy to represent the deceased as a whole.

Mummified organs. Late Period, a matched set of human organs, linen, and bronze masks. From left is Duamutef, Imseti, Qebehsenuef, and Hapi (mask missing). These would've been wrapped in more linen and placed between the legs of the deceased, or perhaps in the abdominal cavity.

Shabti & Ushabti

There is actually a distinction in the terminology of these funerary statuettes. From the Middle Kingdom through the New Kingdom they were called shabti or shawabti; by the Late Period they were called ushabti. The meaning of the first two is contested but is probably related to words like "food" or "stick." The meaning of ushabti is "the answerer."

From Second Intermediate Period. Glazed, wood, and clay statuettes with a painted wood shabti coffin. The glazed shabti in the back row holds a whip and is therefore an overseer of the funerary servants. A closeup of the little coffin. A cruder wood coffin next to a crudely carved wood shabti.

From New Kingdom. Note the limestone shabti at center, which contains Spell 6 from the Book of the Dead to bring the figurine to life. To the right is a small, simple shabti made of clay. Lying on the shelf is a fragment of a mold for producing shabtis.

From New Kingdom. Painted-wood shabtis next to a shabti storage box (not a matched set). The shabtis all have depictions of baskets on their backs, for planting the fields of the afterlife. The beautifully painted storage box was made for the "chief doorkeeper of the temple of Amun," named Ib-er-Amun. Compare to another type of storage box from the Oriental Institute, which contains a large number of tiny shabtis.

From Third Intermediate Period. Figurines of glaze, wood, and clay with the names of the tomb owners painted on them. Note the unusual green-glazed ushabti at center.

From the Late Period. All glazed specimens of high quality, although only the smaller one is inscribed. Note the bright, almost apple-green figurine in the background; this is often a marker for the Saite Period (Dynasty 26).

Miniatures

Soul house. First Intermediate Period or early Middle Kingdom. For a poor burial, providing the deceased a place to dwell in the afterlife (whereas a wealthy man's tomb would be his spirit's home). Note the Osiris figure (representing the deceased) sitting in the room on the roof. In the courtyard is an offering table and food items carved from clay.

Model boat. Photo taken for purposes of the coffin in the background but note the wooden boat, dating to early Middle Kingdom. At the stern stands the captain of the crew. Such boats permitted the deceased to travel on the Nile in the afterlife.

Model workers. First Intermediate Period. Such models were common at this time. The wooden figurines shown performing labor would conduct that labor in the afterlife for the deceased. It is not clear what these figurines are doing; they are standing in various poses around a chest. Such models of workers were the precursors to shabtis.

Offering table. A high-quality example in limestone for a man named Iret-Horru, from the Late Period. Inscribed with offering formulae and depictions of the deceased with food.

Miscellaneous

Burial shrouds. Painted linen, dating to the Late Period. Either example would be the inner-most shroud, with the painted portion facing in toward the body and its wrappings of thin strips of linen; after the painted shroud would be any number of plain shrouds. In the left example note the ba-birds perched on the shoulders of the Osiris figure.

Funerary statue. The god Osiris, ithyphallic, coated with pitch; four cobras appear on torso. The goddess Isis in mourning pose, with Anubis behind her. Isis' face bears gold applique. All these statuettes date to the Late Period.

Osiris on plinth. Painted wood and gold applique, from Late Period. The plinth (base) is hollow for concealing magical texts such as the Book of the Dead. A second example, from which the atef crown has been lost; the face is green as a symbol of fertility.

Calcite jars. From Third Intermediate Period. Originally contained kohl and perfumes, the latter of which tomb raiders frequently stole. Off to the left are examples of jewelry.

Mummy collar. So named because it was fitted onto mummies, and was probably an imitation of broad collars worn by the living. Glazed beads strung together.

Amulets. Varying materials and periods, mostly Late Period. As displayed on the mummy of Harwa (see the "Late Period" section of my original post). At top-center is the "Gold Osiris," a rare amulet made of solid gold. The many scarabs represent rebirth and transformation; the djed pillars, strength and endurance. The hammered-gold oval sheet at bottom-right was used to conceal the incision from which the embalmers removed the organs of a mummy (many examples have the Horus Eye stamped on them, although this one does not).
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conorp
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 6:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
My apologies for taking so long to return to this discussion

I don't mind.

I must say that Apunefer's is my fav of all the Field museum collection.


Do you have nay more info on this at all? (Yes i know i am annoying you Razz)

Also:

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a98/kmt_sesh/FIELD%20MUSEUM/FnrlShrouds.jpg

Is this common, i had never seen anything like this?


Conorp
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 9:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Do you have nay more info on this at all? (Yes i know i am annoying you Razz )


You're definitely not annoying me, conorp. I'm glad you're so interested in the coffin, even though it's not really a high-quality example. Unfortunately I do not have any more info on it, aside from what I've already written. I even tried doing some research on it while I was at the Field but came up empty. I can try again and if I find out anything more I'll let you know.

Quote:
Also:

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a98/kmt_sesh/FIELD%20MUSEUM/FnrlShrouds.jpg

Is this common, i had never seen anything like this?


Yes, this was a fairly common practice--among wealthier people, at least. Most burial shrouds are probably not that elaborate but many have been found. The one on the left has that nice inscription running down the middle but I've never had any luck translating it. It's possible the glyphs say nothing (a practice for which there is ample precedent) or it may be that I simply don't see it. Aset is much better practiced than I am with hieroglyphs so maybe she'll make an appearance and lend a hand. Wink
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conorp
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 9:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Im going to be short and sweet. Thankyou.

Or not lol

Quote:
You're definitely not annoying me, conorp. I'm glad you're so interested in the coffin, even though it's not really a high-quality example. Unfortunately I do not have any more info on it, aside from what I've already written. I even tried doing some research on it while I was at the Field but came up empty. I can try again and if I find out anything more I'll let you know.


Thanks a bunch

Quote:
Yes, this was a fairly common practice--among wealthier people, at least.



I never knew this, thankyou
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 10:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Im going to be short and sweet. Thankyou.


You're welcome, conorp. But remember you don't have to be short and sweet. Lord knows I'm not. Laughing

I started this discussion so that people can ask questions about the collection at the Field Museum, and I like questions!
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conorp
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I like questions!


Ok than, what is the meaning of life LOL
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 10:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Ok than, what is the meaning of life LOL


Well, that I wouldn't know. It's not covered in our Egyptian collection. Razz

I haven't decided yet what I'll post next. I still have numerous categories but none of the pictures have been converted to web yet, so I'll work on it and decide soon.
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

is this information about Apunefer here:



????

If so is there anything new?
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 23, 2008 5:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
is this information about Apunefer here:


LOL No, I think I would've noticed that. That sign is just some general historical information about the New Kingdom. I have access to the museum's intranet database, but only to a point. I've used that to gather a lot of background information about other artifacts, but there simply isn't much on Apubefer there. I'll be at the Field again tomorrow so I'll give it another crack.

I don't know exactly what you're looking for with this coffin. We'll never know much about Apunefer himself, other than his name and that he was probably from Dynasty 18. His inner coffin and mummy are in storage and so I have no access to them. It's a very simple coffin and what you see is, well, pretty much what you get.
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 23, 2008 5:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

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LOL No, I think I would've noticed that


Sorry, its just sometimes it's the obvious things that you don't notice.
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