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Statue of Senenmut

 
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 5:16 am    Post subject: Statue of Senenmut Reply with quote

One of the prized pieces of the Egyptian collection at the Field Museum in Chicago is a small statue of Senenmut, the famous steward of Hatshepsut and likely her paramour. It has been absent from the museum for a long time. It spent much of this time in an institution in Europe and I think it also ended up in the Hatshepsut exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. That exhibit closed last summer.

Senenmut finally found his way back to us a couple of weeks ago and is back in his display case. Applause

It really is one of the most beatiful items in our Egypt hall and I just wanted to share it briefly with you folks. Here's a photo of it:



Senenmut strides forward while carrying Neferure, daughter of Hatshepsut. There are similar statuettes of Senenmut with the princess but in most he is shown seated, with her on his lap, as with this one in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo or this block statue, in the same museum.

Our statue of Senenmut has six horizontal registers of inscriptions running down his kilt, two more horizontal bands on the base, and a vertical band on the base. Additionally there is a long vertical band running the length of the pillar down the back.

The statue contains several of Senenmut's many titles, some of which you can see in the photo below (the coloration is mine because they wouldn't let me inside the case to colorize the real thing Razz ):



The title in red calls Senenmut the "hereditary noble and governor, steward of Amun," the title in blue refers to him as "overseer of the granaries of Amun," and the title in green tells us he was the "steward of the king's daughter."

Note the two spots of yellow on the base. As one so closely aligned with Hatshepsut, who according to ancient Egyptian world view was never supposed to have been a king, the monuments of Senenmut suffered the same sort of defacement as the monuments of Hatshepsut. His name was gouged out wherever it appeared on the statue. (Interestingly the name of Hatshepsut's daughter, Neferure, is still completely intact in its cartouche on the other side of the statue.) On this web page you can see good examples of how thorough the agents of Tuthmosis III were in defacing Senenmut's inscriptions, as well as defacement that must have taken place during the Amarna Period (the name Amun is similary gouged out).

It's a beautiful statue, graceful and serene. The inscriptions are beautifully cut. If you make it to the Field Museum be sure to search it out. Wink
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 7:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for sharing that photograph!

I added it to my Hatshepsut page Smile Hope you don't mind.

Queen Hatshepsut Page


LOL So when you showed up with the colored markers they said no? Shocked
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 8:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I love the statue, Kmt_sesh. Looks like you had a fun time painting by numbers. Laughing There's also a beautiful one here: at the British Museum I always find the Senenmut and Neferure statues very touching; you can really tell that the guy had a lot of love (whether or not it was the romantic kind of love is anyone's guess) for Hatshepsut by the way that he had himself depicted with her daughter.
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 10:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

anneke wrote:
Quote:
I added it to my Hatshepsut page Smile Hope you don't mind.


I don't mind at all and I'm glad you want to use it. The only edit is, it's not at the O.I. but at the Field Museum. I like how you used both images in your layout--looks nice. Of course I also have a version of the profile photo without the colored areas, so let me know if you'd like that.

Quote:
LOL So when you showed up with the colored markers they said no? Shocked


Laughing Oh please, they don't even permit me to bring colored markers to the museum. I used to have this problem with drawing on the walls, you see.

Daughter_Of_SETI wrote:
Quote:
I love the statue, Kmt_sesh. Looks like you had a fun time painting by numbers. Laughing There's also a beautiful one here: at the British Museum...


You know me, I love coloring. Razz I've seen the photo of the statue at the B.M. and it's also a beautiful example. I've noticed how the face is damaged and I've always wondered if that was more or less natural, or intentional defacement by one of Tuthmosis III's goons.
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2007 11:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmt_sesh wrote:
I've seen the photo of the statue at the B.M. and it's also a beautiful example. I've noticed how the face is damaged and I've always wondered if that was more or less natural, or intentional defacement by one of Tuthmosis III's goons.

Hmm...I hadn't thought of that before. Both the Senenmut statues at the British Museum (here, and here; although, the second example is of Senenmut alone) seem to have some chipping around Senenmut's nose area. I know that often 'missing/damaged noses' are blamed on accidents (such as the artefact being knocked over, where the nose would be the first thing to hit the ground, and subsequently, the only thing to be damaged). But in the case of the Senenmut and Neferure statues; he is holding the princess out in front of him, so if the artefact was to fall over it would seem - to me, anyway - that it would be little Neferure that would receive the most damage. Whereas in many statues that I've seen Neferure is undamaged. Confused Could be just coincidence, though. Laughing
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The Aten
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2007 6:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Off Topic Anneke, your website is amazing, so much information! it's in my favourites now, it's something special that's for sure, congratulations, also do you draw those images yourself, the hand drawn ones, if you do you should write that you do, because you have a real skill there!
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anneke
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2007 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Aten Very Happy I'm glad you enjoy the website.

The painted scenes are all done by me. They are based on line drawings - usually by Lepsius. On occasion I take a photograph of a scene and turn that into a painting.
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 12:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daughter_Of_SETI wrote:
Quote:
But in the case of the Senenmut and Neferure statues; he is holding the princess out in front of him, so if the artefact was to fall over it would seem - to me, anyway - that it would be little Neferure that would receive the most damage. Whereas in many statues that I've seen Neferure is undamaged.


That's a good point about Neferure. It's a little too convenient that Senenmut's face is mauled while the little princess remains undamaged. In your second link it looks like the damage also includes the mouth because so much of the lower face has been chipped apart. It's hard to judge, however, because usually when the damage is intentional, the eyes are also gouged out. The object was to remove the effective spirit's sight, breath, and speech (and often enough the hearing, if the ears are hacked).

Maybe they just wanted Senenmut to see Apophis coming for him but not be able to shout for help. Razz

The Aten wrote:
Quote:
Off Topic Anneke, your website is amazing, so much information! it's in my favourites now...


It's okay by me if you mention that because I agree. I've also bookmarked anneke's site and have referred to it often. She's done a tremendous amount of work over the years and I particularly enjoy her own artwork on the pages.
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